abandoned.

traveling to the poconos during the seventies meant you were either on your honeymoon, entertaining business guests, or you were a ‘swinger.’

 

traveling to the poconos in 2017 means you’re either a youtube urban explorer out for the next great video shoot of an abandoned resort, or you’re a family headed to the big indoor waterpark/hotel/human petri dish.

this past week my daughter and I headed to the poconos in hopes of being able to sneak a peek into the past. I plotted out several abandoned places along our route, with the intent of photographing and exploring as many as we could along the way. our first stop in scranton was a bust (torn down and replaced with new homes) our second stop, scranton lace factory, was not conducive to interior exploration but we did take a few exterior shots.

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when we arrived in the poconos and couldn’t get into the summit resort we proceeded to our main destination; penn hills.

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if you know anything about abandoned poconos, you’re familiar with penn hills. let’s just say there’s not much stopping just about anyone from exploring the 85+ acres of pure 70’s honeymoon kitsch (or what’s left of it)

 

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the blend of modernist architecture, mixed with graffiti, broken glass, and the force of nature kept stopping me in my tracks.

 

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at times it was overwhelming.

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human damages far exceeding the unrelenting force of nature.

 

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we only saw a fraction of the property, but it was simply amazing.

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I would have loved to have seen this place kept intact, the bones of the architecture are so fantastic, and it could have been brilliantly returned to it’s glory as a vintage throwback (hipsters would’ve loved overpaying to sleep in a round bed!)

but back taxes and bad business decisions have left it to rot, and it appears that it will most likely be bulldozed rather than restored.

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it made for a wonderful adventure, one we won’t soon forget.

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All images © 2013-2017 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life

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the long road out of texas.

we had no idea how much time we would spend in texas, or, honestly,  how much we’d enjoy that time. frankly, I was amazed at the beauty.

we’re now stuck  so close to the far west border of the state, waiting out a car repair. we’re in a perfectly comfortable hotel (120 channels! free wifi! free breakfast!) and it’s nice just to do the things we used to; lie on the bed scrolling mindlessly through the internet while reality tv drones in the background.

 

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longhorn, fredericksburg, tx. 1.25.2016

 

but it’s also been a time of reflection.
on how far we’ve come; both literally (almost 4,000 miles) and figuratively.

although we’re not experts at any of this, I feel we’ve learned so much about what we need to live and be happy. and it all fits in the car.

 

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primitive camping, big bend national park 1.2016

 

our stay at Big Bend National Park was fabulous. it is a spectacular park, with everything from mountain peaks to wide expanses of desert. we hiked into a canyon one day, followed by a dip in the hot spring nestled right next to the Rio Grande river. every night the sky was the most beautiful show of colors as the sun set behind the ridge.

we hated leaving, but packed up a day earlier than planned due to very high winds. the next day a power line fell on the road about 1/4 mile from our campsite, sparking a wildfire that is still burning as I write this. I can’t help but wonder what it would have been like if we were still there.

 

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looking for mystery lights, marfa. 2/1/2016

 

we moved on to marfa, texas where we enjoyed some great food and met some fabulous people, including an inspiring couple who are riding their bikes through 23 states (towing their two dogs!) It was great talking to them about our mutual goals, what it’s like living on the road, and how it felt leaving the ‘old life’ and possessions behind.

 

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train art, valentine texas. 2/2/2016

 

wandering around west texas waiting for the winds to die down we came across several deserted ghost towns. kent was my favorite. it felt alive, although the houses were empty and filled with broken glass, and burnt sinks, the pipes all ripped out and paint peeling in shattered mosaics. creeping around some of the structures with only the sound of the highway, we felt like we were seeing something we shouldn’t be, and yet we couldn’t stop looking.

 

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abandoned public school, kent tx. 2/2/2016
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abandoned house with eyes. kent, tx. 2/2/2016

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no nuclear waste aqui. kent, tx. 2/2/2016

texas, we’ve loved our stay.

…..but now we must move on.

All images © 2013-2016 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life