odds and ends.

Working our way east, to take care of some business (those pesky health things that just don’t go away) we rushed through most of the entire west-to-mid-west. we ticked five (yes FIVE National Parks off our list in under two weeks (can you say exhausted) and stopped in at some tourist-trappy gems like Wall Drug and the Corn Palace along the way.

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We somehow even had the timing gods lined up so perfectly that we were in Sturgis, SD just in time for what Sturgis is famous for.

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We saw amazing things, breathtaking things that I will never forget. The herd of bison that we found ourselves in the middle of as they crossed the road in Yellowstone. The sun setting on the Grand Tetons. A forest fire up in the hills at dusk outside of Cody, WY.

Badlands National Park.

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The Oregon Coast. Olympic National Park where we hung out with this beautiful creature for about 15 minutes.

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Glacier National Park….Rainier.

And during the long, straight road through the midwest, this:

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miles and miles and miles of sunflowers. “stop!! I need to get out!!”

cars and trucks speeding by on I-90 watching the crazy lady with the camera take a billion photos of the sunflowers.

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I mean, how could I not?  just look at all of them!

For an updated look at where we’ve been…. we have a map for that.

thanks, as always, for reading…more to follow 🙂

 

 

All images © 2010-2016 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life

 

 

after alaska.

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our trip to alaska was a learning experience.

we realized a lot about what we need to exist.

number one on that list:

our car = our freedom. without it we were trapped in a cycle of bad food choices, nothing to do that didn’t rely on the shuttle schedule and ultimately a scary health moment that led us to the decision to leave. isolation is one thing, but being hours away from medical care is a whole other ball of wax when you have a chronic illness.

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number two:

good friends can be made everywhere you go. we met a handful of people that we will definitely stay in touch with. and then we met a few people who became close friends. being in the same situation; living, working, eating, playing together builds strong friendships. that was a positive. that was something we wouldn’t change.

number three:

alaska is just alaska. so on the bus ride (the torturous, five hour bus ride from anchorage to healy) I kept waiting. waiting for the “WOW!!” moment when alaska would knock my socks off. that never came. I mean, it was pretty and it had trees and mountains and more trees…but it wasn’t like, OH OK THIS IS AMAZING. it was just, *shrug* alaska.

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number four:

I never saw a bear: in fact in the months we were there the total wildlife I saw amounted to three moose and a handful of sea gulls. seriously.

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(ok I did get to see this, which was pretty freaking cool. the bus they used in the filming of into the wild which was an inspiration for coming here in the first place.)

number five:

we really just need each other. (I know, right?) but for real. life is about the people you choose to share it with. and then making that time the healthiest, happiest time possible.

stay tuned. we’re moving this party east 🙂

 

 

All images © 2013-2016 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life

 

months and miles.

today marks the day. the sixth month anniversary of loading up the car, waving goodbye to lake erie, cleveland, ohio…..and heading out on the great adventure.

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we honestly had no idea what we were doing.

like, no clue. 

I mean, sure we’d plotted out a general course…looked at a million blogs about how to do what we were doing, but, seriously.

not a clue.

 

so here’s a bit of what we’ve learned:

–you’re going to need half of what you think you’ll need.

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–travel slow, and  if you find a spot that looks good, stay there.

–always stop for the brown signs on the highway exits (they mean good things: national parks, state parks or really touristy fun stuff!)

–buy a national parks pass. just do it. the national parks are the best idea the US has ever had.

–if you find a spot you like, stay there! (btw: free camping is abundant, you just have to know how and where to look for it. we’ve spent a total of $16 on camping in 6 months, all of that in Texas.)

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–adapting to your environment is key.

–travel bloggers on instagram are not showing you everything (like where do they poop?)

–you’re much tougher than you think.

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–time is a social construct. (think about that one….I must ask at least once a week, “wait, what day is it?” because we don’t have to be anywhere, do anything, on anyone else’s time….weekdays or weekends don’t matter. it’s weird and takes time to get used to.)

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–this country is huge, beautiful and is so vastly different if you just travel more than 300 miles outside of your comfort zone. if you don’t like where you are: move! there is so much out there to see and experience.

–people out there (away from the cities) are much nicer, kinder and more generous than you know.

–don’t wait. we’ve met so many women, couples in their retirement years who’ve said to us (all_of_them_have_said_this) “we should have done this at your age, good for you guys.”

don’t wait. 

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where we go from here:

today we are in yakima, washington, on our way to a town north of seattle for the week. we are then boarding a plane friday for anchorage, alaska.

yes, alaska.

we’ll be working up there for the summer outside of denali national park.

I can say this: we are excited to be off the road for a while, but last night as we spent our last night in the car (fittingly in a walmart, just like our first night in new jersey) we were talking about how we are actually going to miss the freedom we’ve had, the autonomy, the rising with the sun, going to bed when it gets dark, and the general not-seeing-any-other-humans that has been so great. we’re going to have a bit of a time adjusting.

but it will also be nice to have showers and meals and a bed whenever we want.

that will be nice.

so, stay tuned from alaska!

xoxo,

j

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All images © 2013-2016 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life

living without.

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hard days. days like yesterday, when we went to do laundry, find internet and get groceries and only accomplished two of the three. (the internet we found was so slow it was worthless for what I needed it for; mainly downloading new things for us to watch during the dark, cold hours between sunset and sleep; and to update my blog. hell, I couldn’t even get Facebook to load, or send photos to my phone via messages.)

hard days, but also learning to live without things, live like we (well, like I) used to live….no internet. today, for example we made a decision to not go to ‘town’, to stay at camp, even though we had not accomplished what we needed yesterday. staying put meant not spending money, but it also meant we had to learn to keep occupied. easy on warm days, not so easy on a chilly day.

I spent some of the day working on the old quilt (of my mom’s) that I’m patching. it was on her bed as a teenager in the fifties, and I’ve had it since my grandpa passed away in 1997. it’s been well loved, and is threadbare in many spots—holes right through in many others. I’m sewing patches on it with embroidery floss, using a blanket stitch. patches of all different sizes, in fabrics I’ve acquired through various means, mainly tiny prints, some from Japan, all very quaint. it’s more than a way to pass the time, it’s marking the days that I’m on this journey, it helps me focus on something other than the road going by, or the silence of the forest. it’s a great meditation, a purpose.

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xander spent most of the day reading. we picked up some books (2 each at under .80/pc from goodwill) while our laundry was washing yesterday. after my fingers started turning numb (even in the wristwarmers I pulled from my jeannieknits stash… it is still. so. freaking. cold!) I crawled in the car, and under the blankets, and passed the rest of the afternoon reading as well.

I joked later we were living like Laura Ingalls Wilder.

I’m not sure x got the reference.

———-

we also looked at the map (MAP!) of texas that we picked up at the welcome center and mapped out 2 possible routes through the state (see, internet, we don’t need you!) and are planning on heading out from here tuesday and head to the shores of the gulf…time for some sun and sand.

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sam houston national forest 1/19/2016

home is where you make it.

When I was about seven, we moved from the tiny brick bungalow, and the only home I’d known, into a shiny, new, yellow aluminum sided four bedroom colonial. It was nestled on a the end of a cul de sac in a neighborhood that was full of strange kids who would become my walk to school friends, kick the can buddies and all around partners in crime….and  I was excited. I love change.

In the past five years since getting divorced, however, I’ve moved seven times. Change at that rate gets a little old. Kick the can games fewer and far between.

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My latest stop has me renting a condo, which means the month that you decide to go “off lease” and rent month to month is exactly the time the landlord calls and tells you he has someone interested in buying that condo. Change? It seems to like me more than I like it at this point.

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But, on the other hand, maybe it’s a good thing.

I’m also turning (a BIG number birthday…like a really big one…halfway to being mentioned by Williard Scott and being sponsored by Smucker’s big) this week and have always dreamt of seeing this amazing country of ours.

We (my current partner in crime and myself) have been slowly planning, plotting, budgeting…a way to travel around to the National Parks — seeing everything I’ve / we’ve / never gotten to see. Hence the big map on our wall.

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After all, home can be anywhere…..in a big, shiny, yellow aluminum house on a cul de sac, or in the front seat next to your best pal driving across the country…..

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stay tuned.

 

 

All images © 2013-2016 Jeannie M. Starks / two daisies life

are internet friends imaginary friends?

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today, after wishing two of my long-time friends happy birthday (via twitter) and realizing that I’d never even met either of them, I began to think about all of the people I easily call friends, yet we’ve only communicated via the web. does this make them any less of a friend, or more? my internet friends (most of whom I’ve connected with through the old etsy forum or twitter) know more about me than some of my family. they’ve been there through the end of my marriage, the milestones and struggles of my three kids, break ups and make ups, job loss, job attainment and more. they’re always there—and gladly offer support, advice or just humor without hesitation or prejudice. the seemingly unconditional friendships I have with my online friends is a comfort I’ve grown accustomed to, and would miss dearly if the inter-webs collapsed.

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several of these online relationships have grown into long time ‘real life’ friends, whom I chat with, have visited in their home states….one of whom actually dropped everything in her life and drove five hours upon hearing I was in the hospital. (that’s a serious friend). but I really believe these now IRL friends became who they are to me from those years of fostering the relationship on the internet. getting to know someone without any preconceived notions about them, their appearance, where they live, etc. creates a relationship that is truly just built on friendship and support…..and is not imaginary at all.

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for: anna, jon, tina, beth, sarah, kate, vanessa, katie

xoxo